The Comics Bureau

Comics Culture

Who do you write for, and how to improve

with 2 comments

Norwegian comics writer Olaf Solstrand writes up some good advice for publishing webcomics.

While you may make a great webcomic, I guess it’s not really a comic about webcomics. So why focus solely on webcomic fans when building your readers? Take what your comic is really about and use that to win readers.

Although his article focuses on webcomics, I think that the principle remains the same for most comics. Marketing comics to a comics crowd is very much singing to the choir.

Olaf also writes a very interesting article on improving.

This is what improvement is all about: Realizing what your greatest weaknesses are, and changing them. If you believe that you are perfect, you will never improve. Everybody has mistakes — you need to find yours if you want to get rid of them.

The basic idea? You suck – figure out why!

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Written by The Department of Illustration

August 18, 2009 at 6:59 am

2 Responses

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  1. Thanks for the links! Yes, I agree that the principle remains the same for most comics.

    I seem to recall that back when Gladstone was still publishing Disney Comics and Don Rosa made his 12-part “The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck”, one part originally named “The Argonaut of White Agony Creek” in Europe was renamed “King of the Klondike” in the US, and they put the title directly on the cover (something they very rarely did). Why? According to Rosa’s speculations, it’s so that they could sell a batch to the Dawson tourist department. If it’s true, it’s a great example of what I’m writing about… It is easy to sell this comic to the Uncle Scrooge fans, but a comic about how the richest duck in the world became rich during the gold rush should of course be marketed heavily in the place where the gold rush actually happened.

    Olaf Moriarty Solstrand

    August 18, 2009 at 7:25 am

  2. Thanks, that’s a great example!


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